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UKAS Guidance on the Application of ISO/IEC 17025 Dealing with Expressions of Opinions and Interpretations 2017

{Consensus: This document is available for community feedback to be added to the platform}

Laboratories within the UK who wish to demonstrate that they operate to a quality system, are technically competent and are able to generate technically valid results must now meet the ISO/IEC 17025 requirements. This has now become the standard that UKAS now to assess a laboratory’s competence for the purposes of accreditation.

The purpose of this document is to set down United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) policy, process and guidance on assessment and accreditation of laboratories 

The difference in this policy set out is that laboratories UKAS policy that laboratory accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 can now include the expression of opinions and interpretation of test/calibration results in reports as it is considered to be an inherent part of testing. Whereas before this was not permitted.

The laboratory’s documented quality system must reflect whether it is expressing opinions and interpretations and if so, for which activities. The process of interpreting test/calibration results for the purpose of expressing opinions and interpretations must be documented. 

 

Published 01/01/2019
Authoring body: United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS)
Policy
Resource
UKAS Guidance on the Application of ISO/IEC 17025 Dealing with Expressions of Opinions and Interpretations

{This document was retired in March 2021 to be replaced by a more current version}

Laboratories within the UK who wish to demonstrate that they operate to a quality system, are technically competent and are able to generate technically valid results must now meet the ISO/IEC 17025 requirements. This replaced the ISO/IEC Guide 25 and EN 45001, and has now become the standard that UKAS now to assess a laboratory’s competence for the purposes of accreditation instead of UKAS publication M10.

The purpose of this document is to set down United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) policy, process and guidance on assessment and accreditation of laboratories 


The difference in this policy set out is that laboratories UKAS policy that laboratory accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 can now include the expression of opinions and interpretation of test/calibration results in reports as it is considered to be an inherent part of testing. Whereas before this was not permitted.

The laboratory’s documented quality system must reflect whether it is expressing opinions and interpretations and if so, for which activities. The process of interpreting test/calibration results for the purpose of expressing opinions and interpretations must be documented. 


 

Published 01/01/2001
Authoring body: United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS)
Policy
Resource
Guidance on Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) Performance, Assessment and Optimisation

{Consensus: This document is open for community feedback for it to be added to the platform}

This guidance document suggests how to set up, maintain, monitor and maximise the performance of an ANPR system. It is written for law enforcement ANPR operatives and commercial installers on behalf of the National ANPR Strategy Board. It applies to ANPR systems that are part of the National ANPR Infrastructure (NAI) and may feed data into the National ANPR System (NAS).

Users should also consider the Data protection Act 2018 and Surveillance Camera Code of Practice when using this document.

Published 01/06/2020
Authoring body: Home Office
Guidance
Resource
ICT Asset Recovery Standard 7.0

Asset Disposal & Information Security Alliance (ADISA) is an organisation designed to improve risk management and data protection within business processes for IT asset retirement and disposal.

The ADISA ICT Asset Recovery Standard 7.0 is an updated version released in January 2020 from its first launch from its first launch in 2010. It better aligns to the updates and amendments of the Data Protection legislation including but not limited to the EU General Data Protection Regulation, the UK Data Protection Act and the Californian Consumer Privacy Act 2018.

This area covers asset management and data sanitisation. The ADISA ICT Asset Recovery Standard was developed to identify risk which might exist within this process and to then assess countermeasures which are in place to mitigate that risk.

 The objective of the ADISA Asset Recovery Standard is to ensure that every data bearing asset is managed throughout the process and that any resident data is sanitised in accordance with the client’s requirements or to industry best practice levels, to promote the re-use of assets through risk management and to help organisations comply with Data Protection Laws.

These are achieved by creating a physical environment within the ITAD process which offers equivalent levels of security to those in place when the asset is in its live environment, testing the abilities of the service provider to create and then maintain the chain of custody throughout the process, ensuring the process is consistent and repeatable, assessing current data sanitisation processes on ALL media types.

The Standard is presented in 10 Modules each covering different aspects in asset recovery and contain mandatory requirements.

There are current plans for version 8 of this document.

Published 01/01/2020
Authoring body: Asset Disposal & Information Security Alliance (ADISA)
Standards
Resource
Engagement & Communication APP

Police engagement and communication is key to the success of community policing and having an effective presence in the area the police serves in. Developing and maintaining healthy and positive relationships with community leaders and the wider public is crucial for establishing engagement. Without this being able to prevent, detect or investigate and solve crime may become much more difficult, as well as bringing offenders to justice. It will reduce confidence and public image in the Police service as service to the public may become unworkable. There it is important that both the public and Police service both cooperate and be in intentional about developing strong relations.

It is important to the local police that communities have confidence and trust in the Police Service in order for the Police to carry out their duties effectively and to keep communities safe. Both parties play an essential role in the world of policing.

This document sets out the principles of engagement and communication, including public relations.

Published 01/01/2017
Authoring body: College of Policing (CoP)
Guidance
Resource
Government Security Classification

{Consensus: This document is currently open for community feedback for it to be added to the platform}

This document describes how HM Government classifies information assets into OFFICAL, OFFICIAL SENSITIVE, SECRET and TOP SECRET to ensure information can be protected but also efficiently shared. This is not a statutory scheme, but operates within the requirements of the Official Secrets Acts (1911 and 1989) and the Freedom of Information Act (200) and Data Protection legislation.

Published 01/05/2018
Authoring body: Cabinet Office
Policy
Resource
Facing the Camera - Guidance on police use of overt CCTV and facial recognition to locate persons on a watchlist in public

{Consensus: This document is open for community feedback for it to be added to the platform in order to provide regulatory information sparked in direct response to a legal challenge.}

This code of practice issued by the Secretary of State (regulated by the Surveillance Camera Commissioner) under the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 (PoFA) covers police forces in England & Wales. Chief officers must have regard to this code when using facial recognition algorithms as part of the operation of surveillance camera systems, or the use or processing of images or other information obtained.

The code only applies to the use of facial recognition technology and processing of images from surveillance cameras operated in 'live time' or 'near real time' operational scenarios.

The code includes considerations into:

  • Applicability
  • Biometrics
  • Ethics
  • Human Rights
  • Legal frameworks
  • Police policy documents
  • Governance
  • Evidence handling
  • Public engagement
  • Accountability and certification

Also included as an attachment is the National Surveillance Camera Strategy for context.

Published 01/11/2020
Authoring body: Surveillance Camera Commissioner (SCC)
Principles
Resource
DCMI Specifications

Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) publishes semantic specifications, mostly related to the "Dublin Core" vocabularies, metadata, such as encoding syntaxes, usage guidelines, and metadata models and has fifteen elements. The growth of the publishing specifications led to the discussion of it becoming a standard and led to the publication of ANSI/NISO Z39.85-2001 and International Standards Organisation Standard 15836-2003. The most recent updates of these standards are RFC 5791 (2010), Z39-85-2012, and ISO 15836-1:2017. 

DCMI Specification also includes

  1. Bibliographic Ontology (BIBO),  a Semantic Web vocabulary for expressing citations and bibliographic references

  2. Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) a collection of classes, properties and concept schemes for mark-up and description of educational resources. It augments on Schema.org for description of learning resources. 

The LRMI concept schemes are small sets of concepts for use as values with the LRMI properties in learning resource description and Web markup.

The DCMI Usage Board has served as the maintenance committee for DCMI Metadata Terms and maintenance of maintenance agency for ISO 15836.

 

Published 01/01/2018
Authoring body: Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)
Standards
Resource
Cloud Security Guidance

Published by the National cyber security centre, this guidance document provides details and context on the following 14 cloud security principles.

1. Data in transit

2. Asset protection and resilience

3. Separation between users

4. Governance framework

5. Operational security

6. Personnel security

7. Secure development

8. Supply chain security

9. Secure user management

10. Identity and authentication

11. External interface protection

12. Secure service administration

13. Audit information for users

14. Secure use of the service

 

Published 17/11/2018
Authoring body: National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)
Guidance
Resource
Forensic Science Regulator Information Legal Obligations (Issue 8)

The role of the forensic science regulator is to advise the Government and the criminal justice system on quality standards in the provision of forensic science. Recommend new requirements for new and improved standards and providing advice and guidance so that providers will be able to demonstrate compliance with common standards, in procurement and in courts 


A key requirement of any standards framework in forensic science is that the output meets the requirements of the Criminal Justice System (CJS). 
 This document sets out the view of the Regulator as to the legal landscape within which forensic scientists operate within the CJS. 


There are legal obligations placed on expert witnesses as sources in the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales as Expert evidence is admissible “to furnish the court with scientific information which is likely to be outside the experience and the knowledge of a judge or jury”. This places the expert witness in a privileged position.

It is important to note that expert evidence can only be given by a person who is an expert in the relevant field. An expert witness must provide the court with objective, unbiased opinion on 
matters within his expertise 
Witnesses must act with honesty and good faith. 


Published 30/04/2020
Authoring body: Forensic Science Regulator (FSR)
Standards