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Code of Practice and Conduct - Forensic Science Regulator (Issue 3)

The Codes of Practice and Conduct for Forensic Science Investigators, providers and practitioners is about ensuring quality standards are upheld to the highest order to the codes set out in the document. This code of Practice also set out the additional requirements requirement for accreditation is provided, particularly for digital forensics, firearms classification, drugs and toxicology.

This document has been written to assist organisations with understanding and interpreting the requirements of the standards, particularly BS/EN ISO/IEC 17025.

When the provisions in the Codes are fully implemented by all forensic science providers and practitioners and are understood by all end users, the potential for a forensic science quality failure to cause a miscarriage of justice will be substantially reduced and will provide a clear indication to customers and the public of what to expect.

It is important to note that forensic science quality framework does not operate in isolation and therefore it has been recommended that all interested parties in the  all forensic science space should read the appendices to the Codes (FSR-C- series) and guidance documents (FSR-G-series) relevant to their areas of expertise, and also the general guidance document on cognitive bias effects (FSR-G-217). The forensic science quality framework does not operate in isolation.

Published 01/01/2016
Authoring body: Forensic Science Regulator (FSR)
Standards
Resource
Police Use of Digital Images

{Consensus: This standard is currently out for consensus to be archived due to being replaced with the current version covering images, video and audio (multimedia)}

 

We live in a modern digital age society, where technological advancement is at the forefront of many initiatives and change, and as such evidential information have become ever so crucial than ever before.

With the high usage of smart phones, laptops, the Internet and social media, digital images and recordings are pivotal in police investigation. This cannot be underestimated. They are now a useful source of evidence for criminal justice purposes. Other evidences such as eye witness accounts, police statements are still highly valuable pieces of information and should neither be underestimated. Both together provide a holistic picture when investigating criminal cases.

As a result, the Police have a key role in managing, capturing, editing, processing, preparing cases, disclosing this to the Crown Prosecution service (CPS), storing, retaining and disposing of digital images carefully and according to guidelines highlighted. This document aims to offer practical guidance and advice on the role police play in digital imaging.

For more information and enquiries please see details below.

Email: soc@npia.pnn.police.uk

Telephone: 0870 241 5641


Published 01/01/2007
Authoring body: National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA)
Guidance
Resource
Video surveillance systems for use in security applications BS 62676

{Consensus: This document is available for community feedback on whether to add to the platform}

This document has been written by subject matter experts, together with many governmental organisations, test houses and equipment manufacturers to defined a common framework for video surveillance transmission in order to achieve interoperability between products. 

The 62676 series is divided into 4 independent parts:
Part 1: System requirements (with 2 sub-parts: General and Performance requirements)
Part 2: Video transmission protocols
Part 3: Analog and digital video interfaces
Part 4: Application guidelines

This standard is intended to assist Video Surveillance System suppliers, users (including law enforcement), integrators and other interested parties achieve a complete and accurate specification of the surveillance system. This standard standard does not specify the type of technology required for a certain observation task.

[Note that this document, despite being authored in 2014, has been reviewed by subject matter experts in April 2021 and deemed to still represent good practice and relevancy]

Published 01/05/2014
Authoring body: British Standards Institute (BSI)
Standards
Resource
ISO/IEC 27003:2017 Preview

ISO (the International Organisation for Standardisation) and IEC (the International Electrotechnical Commission) form the specialised system for worldwide standardisation. National bodies that are members of ISO or IEC participate in the development of International Standards through technical committees established by the respective organisation to deal with particular fields of technical activity. In the field of information technology, ISO and IEC have established a joint technical committee, ISO/IEC JTC 1.

This document provides guidance on the requirements for an information security management system (ISMS) as specified in ISO/IEC 27001 and provides recommendations (‘should’), possibilities (‘can’) and permissions (‘may’) in relation to them. It is not the intention of this document to provide general guidance on all aspects of information security.

Clauses 4 to 10 of this document mirror the structure of ISO/IEC 27001:2013.

This document does not add any new requirements for an ISMS and its related terms and definitions. Organisations should refer to ISO/IEC 27001 and ISO/IEC 27000 for requirements and definitions. Organisations implementing an ISMS are under no obligation to observe the guidance in this document.

An ISMS emphasises the importance of the following phases:

  • understanding the organisation’s needs and the necessity for establishing information security policy and information security objectives;

  • assessing the organisation's risks related to information security;

  • implementing and operating information security processes, controls and other measures to treat risks;

  • monitoring and reviewing the performance and effectiveness of the ISMS; and

  • practising continual improvement.

Published 01/01/2017
Authoring body: International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO)
Standards
Resource
Extraction of digital data from personal devices APP

Guidance on the legal and ethical extraction of data from personal devices (including witnesses and victims) involved in an investigation. .

 

Use the Contact Us tab at the top of the page to request further details.

Published
Authoring body: College of Policing (CoP)
Guidance
Resource
Live Facial Recognition APP

Guidance for the overt deployment of live facial recognition technology to locate persons on a Watchlist. This is currently in draft format and is to be circulated to external stakeholders for consultation prior to submission to National Standards Assurance Board for publication on the platform.

Use the Contact Us tab at the top of the page to request further details.

Published
Authoring body: College of Policing (CoP)
Guidance
Resource
Records Management Code of Practice

The Code provides high-level standards for information and records management (in the form of seven principles), as well as other supporting standards, such as personnel and organisational capabilities. It will also drive consistency in the way that forces manage their information and records.

 

Use the Contact Us tab at the top of the page to request further details.

Published
Authoring body: College of Policing (CoP)
Standards
Resource
Archiving of records in the public interest APP

This APP provides context for forces using the Information and Records Management Code of Practice to enable them to develop nationally consistent approach to identifying the proper regime of management and archiving for information records.

This guidance helps forces with the identification of records for long-term archiving and advises on how those records should be managed throughout their lifecycle, again securing consistency of approach.

Compliance with the Code and APP should help to increase the public’s confidence in how their information is handled.

Use the Contact Us tab at the top of the page to request further details.

 

Published
Authoring body: College of Policing (CoP)
Guidance
Resource
NPCC Digital Imaging and Multimedia Procedure (Version 3)

{Consensus: This document is available for community feedback on whether to add to the platform, replacing the previous 2007 version}

This document covers digital multimedia, inclusive of picture, video and audio in the proper capture and handling of digital data for police applications. This represents best practice to benefit the Police Service and Criminal Justice System (CJS).

Following the process set out within this document helps enhance the integrity of proper evidential gathering processes whilst reducing the risk of malicious manipulation. 

 

Published 01/01/2020
Authoring body: National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC)
Guidance
Resource
Digital Imaging Procedure (Version 2.1)

{Consensus: This is open to the community for comment on whether to retire this document and replace by the newer Digital Imaging and Multimedia Procedure version 3}

Digital imaging has become firmly established in the mainstream of public life and as a key enabling technology for the Police Service and Criminal Justice System (CJS) and has enormous benefit for the swift and accurate outcome of investigations.

Digital Imaging is the capture, retrieval, storage or use of evidential digital images. The aim of this document is to detail the processes involved in the proper capture and handling of digital images for police applications and to define best working practice starting from the process of the initial preparation and capture of images, through the transfer and designation of Master and Working Copies, to the presentation in court and finally the retention and disposal of exhibits.

A key part of the digital imaging process is the creation of an identifiable and isolated Master reference as this procedure enhances the integrity of proper evidential gathering processes whilst reducing the risk of malicious manipulation. It is also important to note that broader range of technologies are now available for the capture and storage of digital imagery which will be discussed in the document.

Intended readers of this document are operational, administrative and judicial staff involved throughout all stages of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) and anyone handling digital imaging.  

Published 01/01/2007
Authoring body: Home Office
Guidance